DAP’s Superman promises to be ‘decent’ in future

DAP’s Superman promises to be ‘decent’ in future

PETALING JAYA: Fiery DAP politician Hew Kuan Yau, who drew flak over a crude and allegedly racist speech when campaigning during the Sarawak election, has promised to refrain from vulgarities in future.

“My politically-oriented ‘stand-up comedy’ will now be clean,” he vowed in a Facebook post, adding that his speeches often contained humour, facts and were peppered with metaphors.

Hew, attracted controversy after a video surfaced online in which he urged Chinese voters in Batu Kitang to back DAP’s Abdul Aziz Isa, so the latter could “screw the Malays”, and “screw the corrupt Malay officials” when he made it to the state assembly.

He also got a ticking off from party supremo Lim Kit Siang for being vulgar although the latter claimed there was nothing racist about Hew’s speech.

However, Hew, known as the “Superman” of DAP after his penchant for wearing t-shirts with the Superman logo, accused Umno cybertroopers of distorting the subtitles of the speech he made in Mandarin to make him look like a racist.

Hew said nowhere in his speech had he asked Sarawak Chinese to vote for Abdul Aziz so that he could “screw” the Malays.

He also said he was only referring to the “corrupt” PBB (Sarawak Barisan Nasional’s anchor party) and not the Malays per se.

In a related matter, MCA Central Committee member Jason Teoh said Lim aggravated the situation by refusing to acknowledge that Hew’s speech was racist.

In a statement, Teoh also wondered if the Gelang Patah lawmaker had suddenly lowered the bar on what is considered racism.

“Why is Kit Siang suddenly defending the indefensible?” he asked.

DAP’s Superman promises to be ‘decent’ in future

DAP’s Superman promises to be ‘decent’ in future

PETALING JAYA: Fiery DAP politician Hew Kuan Yau, who drew flak over a crude and allegedly racist speech when campaigning during the Sarawak election, has promised to refrain from vulgarities in future.

“My politically-oriented ‘stand-up comedy’ will now be clean,” he vowed in a Facebook post, adding that his speeches often contained humour, facts and were peppered with metaphors.

Hew, attracted controversy after a video surfaced online in which he urged Chinese voters in Batu Kitang to back DAP’s Abdul Aziz Isa, so the latter could “screw the Malays”, and “screw the corrupt Malay officials” when he made it to the state assembly.

He also got a ticking off from party supremo Lim Kit Siang for being vulgar although the latter claimed there was nothing racist about Hew’s speech.

However, Hew, known as the “Superman” of DAP after his penchant for wearing t-shirts with the Superman logo, accused Umno cybertroopers of distorting the subtitles of the speech he made in Mandarin to make him look like a racist.

Hew said nowhere in his speech had he asked Sarawak Chinese to vote for Abdul Aziz so that he could “screw” the Malays.

He also said he was only referring to the “corrupt” PBB (Sarawak Barisan Nasional’s anchor party) and not the Malays per se.

In a related matter, MCA Central Committee member Jason Teoh said Lim aggravated the situation by refusing to acknowledge that Hew’s speech was racist.

In a statement, Teoh also wondered if the Gelang Patah lawmaker had suddenly lowered the bar on what is considered racism.

“Why is Kit Siang suddenly defending the indefensible?” he asked.

Respect choices made by Sarawakians, says DAP rep

Respect choices made by Sarawakians, says DAP rep

PETALING JAYA: A Sarawak DAP assemblyman has called for those criticising and condemning Sarawakians for voting in the Barisan Nasional, to respect the choices of voters in the state.

According to a Borneo Post Online report, Wong King Wei, the assemblyman for Padungan said the democratic system had to be respected.

“For whatever reasons, Sarawakian voters made their decisions. Whether to support DAP or BN, this is their choice.”

A barrage of comments harshly criticising Sarawakians for choosing BN over the Opposition, surfaced on social media sites following last Saturday’s Sarawak election.

On the allegation by DAP National Publicity Chief Tony Pua of money politics in the state election, Wong said that if at all it was true, it was just one of the factors for the loss of support the Opposition suffered.

“One of the factors, of course, is money politics, but I believe it is only part of it.

“A larger part of it is, we in DAP have to reflect on ourselves on what we are lacking and how we can do better in the future.”

He noted that it would not be correct to assume money politics which was allegedly rampant in some areas, was also rampant in others.

“In some of the areas, we got quite good support from the Dayak voters. However, in some Chinese areas, we lost support. How do you interpret this?” he was quoted as saying, adding that it was time for reflection.

Superhuman ability needed to deny Hew’s racist remarks

Superhuman ability needed to deny Hew’s racist remarks

PETALING JAYA: Ti Lian Ker of MCA has challenged DAP supremo Lim Kit Siang and the party to walk the talk on accountability and take firm action against its firebrand leader Hew Kuan Yau.

Ti said he was baffled by Lim’s defence of Hew over the latter’s controversial racist remarks made in the run up to the May 7 Sarawak election.

While Lim had slammed Hew over his use of vulgarity, he however denied the latter’s remarks were racist as alleged.

“It takes superhuman ability to deny what Hew had said was racist. Does the ‘D’ in DAP stand for ‘Denial’?”

Ti said Hew could have got his point across that the DAP Batu Kitang candidate, Abdul Aziz Isa, would be able to take on “corrupt” PBB leaders if elected without dragging the word “Malay” into his argument.

“Let’s face it, if an Umno politician had inserted the race of someone he or she was chastising, DAP would make a meal out of it and slam leaders who say it is not racist,” he said, adding that it was highly likely that Lim would even demand Prime Minister Najib Razak be held accountable.

Ti, a Central Working Committee member of MCA, said if Lim and DAP were sincere about standing against racism, then more stringent action must be taken against Hew, with the least being banning him from speaking publicly.

Ti also questioned why the controversial figure had not shown any remorse and said, “If Hew really believes what he said was not racist, I dare him to repeat what he said in Malay and English.

“When International Trade and Industries Minister Mustapa Mohamed joked about a new building being like a new wife, he apologised after it ruffled feathers.”

Ti said if Hew had an iota of decency in him, he would apologise, unless the ‘A’ in DAP stood for “Arrogant.”

He added that Hew’s speech was similar to the kind of thrash talk spewed by other frustrated netizens, who spoke in condescending tones to Sarawakians after Barisan Nasional won the state election with a landslide victory.

Hew attracted controversy after a video surfaced online, in which he urged Chinese voters in Batu Kitang to back Abdul Aziz, so the latter could “screw the Malays”, and “screw the corrupt Malay officials” when he made it to the state assembly.

However Hew, known as “Superman” of DAP after his penchant for wearing Superman T-shirts, accused Umno “cybertroopers” of distorting the subtitles of the speech he made in Mandarin to make him look like a racist.

Hew said nowhere in his speech had he asked Sarawak Chinese to vote for Abdul Aziz so that he could “screw” the Malays.

He also said he was only referring to the “corrupt” PBB (Sarawak’s anchor party) and not the Malays per se.

Opposition must respect S’wakians in order to win polls

Opposition must respect S’wakians in order to win polls

PETALING JAYA: Tian Chua of PKR said today the Opposition failed to win the just concluded Sarawak state election because they neither respected nor understood the locals.

He also regretted that some Opposition supporters had stooped “so low as to call the locals stupid for not voting in the Opposition.”

He said the Opposition needed to respect the decision of the locals to vote for Barisan Nasional (BN) and strive to understand the complexity of the issues in Sarawak which were different from those in the peninsula.

“If they voted for BN, respect their wishes. If they had obtained monetary gains from BN, we should understand why they did that. We should not put them down for that,” he told FMT today.

The Sarawak election was held on May 7. BN won 72 seats and DAP, seven while PKR won in Krian, Ba’kelalan and Batu Lintang.

The PKR vice-president said the Sarawak war for votes was not about reaching out to voters via social media or ceramah held during the election period.

“Locals say if they vote for the Opposition, they will have to face the village heads and district officers. They say when they face intimidation for land acquisition and other matters, we are not there on behalf of them,” alleged Tian Chua.

“It is easier for Sarawakians to vote for the ruling party. They don’t mind any monetary gains and vote for BN because life is easier for them and their communities after the elections,” he added.

One of the ways to solve the issue was by appointing more local activists in Sarawak to fight local issues, said the Batu MP.

For instance, PKR did very well in one of the most remote areas in Sarawak, Ba’kelalan because the locals were aware their candidate Baru Bian, a lawyer, would be there for them.

He said PKR won Ba’kelalan despite BN’s promises to build churches and roads, which clearly showed that the locals wanted a candidate who would stand for their rights.

“Baru Bian is there for them. It gives them assurance. That is what they want.”

He said PKR would want to duplicate this example in the rest of Sarawak in their preparation for the next Sarawak state election.

He said they should not blame BN for having better facilities, such as helicopters to visit remote areas while the Opposition had to take boats or “literally crawl into very remote areas to meet voters. They need to know we will be there for them all the time and not only during the elections.”

Many Opposition grassroots from outside the state, who couldn’t fathom the loss, called Sarawakians “brainless voters” and “stupid sohai Sarawakians.”

Earlier today, Opposition leader Wan Azizah Wan Ismail gave her assurance that PKR would learn from its shortcomings in the Sarawak election to prepare for the next general election.

She said she had asked the leadership to identify weaknesses, to learn from their shortcomings and to take necessary steps to correct the party’s strategy and organisational capacity in time for the next big battle – GE14.

Ti: Anti-Sarawakian comments giving Chinese a bad name

Ti: Anti-Sarawakian comments giving Chinese a bad name

PETALING JAYA: The barrage of comments, demonising Sarawakians for choosing the Barisan Nasional in Saturday’s state election is an indication of the immaturity of some Opposition supporters, says Ti Lian Ker of the MCA.

The party’s Central Working Committee member also claimed that these supporters, who lashed out at Sarawakians on social media, were aping the hate spewed over the years by Opposition leaders who could not tolerate dissenting opinions and resorted to demonising those who did not share the same view.

Ti said that this was why he was not surprised to see a “frustrated” lot lash out at Sarawakians following BN’s victory, although he was saddened all the same by their actions.

He said the screenshots of the crude comments had gone viral and made the Chinese community sound condescending, arrogant and disrespectful, when in reality the people who made the comments did not represent the views and culture of the community in general.

“We must respect the democratic right of Sarawakians to choose who they want to lead the state.

“What if other Malaysians criticised and mocked the people of Selangor and Penang for choosing an Opposition-led government in the same way or manner? The Opposition would cry foul and the entire BN would be blamed for it,” he told FMT.

Saying the netizens who engaged in insults and name-calling did not reflect a mature and democratic society, he also chastised Opposition leaders who failed to admonish their “misbehaving” supporters.

“It is time for all to sit back and reflect on the ugly and sad state that we are in today and be ashamed.”

Meanwhile, SUPP information chief Adam Yii was reported in The Star as saying that the comments made against Sarawakians reflected the politics of hate that was present today.

He said that while it was evident those posting such messages could not except the results of the polls, their messages of extreme hate were however beyond decency.

Yii added Sarawakians had made their choice and everyone should move on.

Following Saturday’s polls, in which the BN won 72 out of the 82 seats it contested, hateful posts on social media, mocking and insulting Sarawakians began to surface and quickly went viral.

DAP citing wrong reason for its poor show

DAP citing wrong reason for its poor show

PETALING JAYA: Sarawak DAP chief Chong Chieng Jen is ignoring the obvious in attributing his party’s poor performance in last Saturday’s election to low voter turnout and dismissing the effect of Chief Minister Adenan Satem’s popularity, according to political analyst Jeniri Amir of Universti Malaysia Sarawak.

Speaking to FMT, Jeniri said the main reason for Barisan Nasional’s impressive victory was that Adenan was popular with all communities, including the Chinese. He said this was shown in the reduction of votes for DAP in its Chinese-majority strongholds.

He was commenting on Chong’s statement that low voter turnout, not the so-called Adenan factor, was the main reason for DAP’s loss of five seats.

Jeniri said there was no guarantee that voters who did not turn up would have voted for DAP.

“If what Chong is saying about lower voter turnout is true, then DAP would not have been able to retain the seven seats that it did,” he said.

He noted that the Election Commission had said the voter turnout was 70%. This was close to the turnout at the 2011 state election, he pointed out.

Jeniri said the opposition needed to accept that Adenan’s popularity was the main factor in the polls, which saw BN winning 88% of the seats as well as the popular vote.

“The opposition parties need to do some soul searching,” he said. “If they keep harping on issues that have no relevance to Sarawak, like 1MDB and the RM 2.6 billion issue, they’ll not be able to improve their performance.”

Jeniri also dismissed PKR Vice-President Xavier Jayakumar’s assertion that a lack of opposition unity cost DAP the five seats.

Referring to multi-cornered contests where both DAP and PKR fielded candidates, he said, “Even the combined number of votes for DAP and PKR would not have been able to defeat BN.”

DAP undone by its own arrogance

DAP undone by its own arrogance

DAP leaders adopt an uncomfortably colonialist tone in their rhetoric when speaking about the party’s work in Sarawak. They refer to the party’s work in the hinterland as efforts to “improve the natives’ lives”. Thus the “Impian Sarawak” programme is to “bridge the rural-urban divide” and to bring about other uplifting things.

That isn’t to say that such work is not good. Any effort to repair the state’s logging-ravaged interior is commendable and should be supported. But if that’s your party’s entire shtick, maybe you need to realise that you’re sounding just a tad colonialist.

The Sarawak state election last weekend put this in stark highlight. The overwhelming Barisan Nasional victory saw DAP losing not only rural bumiputera seats (in some cases with their votes outnumbered by independent votes), but also the largely Chinese seats such as Batu Kitang and Repok.

It was sheer arrogance that led to the party’s downfall. It made a great deal out of its West Malaysian politicians being barred from the state, forgetting how little Sarawakians want to do with politics on the peninsula. Nobody in Sarawak cares about politicians here. Sarawakians want to hear their local candidates both Chinese and bumiputera who know the land inside and out.

Of course, the opposition’s supporters in West Malaysia have not been happy with the result of the election. This colonialist arrogance isn’t limited to just DAP; it’s an overwhelmingly West Malaysian thing. And nowhere else is this more apparent than in the way the opposition supporters have responded online, castigating the Sarawakians for their “stupidity”.

Perhaps this unedited comment by an irate Facebook user sums it up best: “Good job Sarawak stay in jungle forever.” According to a compilation of Facebook comments by Raja Petra Kamarudin, it isn’t alone in its ugly condescension to Sarawak voters, as the the following unedited comments show:

“Congratulations Sarawakians, continue burning your candles and collect rain water for the next 5 years.”

“Disappointed with so many ignorant and cheap Sarawakians who voted for BN for money.”

“Sarawak, you can continue to stay uneducated and undeveloped. You’ll never learn.”

The list goes on, with the comments getting progressively viler and more disgusting in their name-calling. It really shouldn’t be surprising then that Sarawak wants nothing to do with their compatriots on the peninsula.

This isn’t a blanket judgement on all West Malaysians and the politicians they support. This is merely to show to what insulting level our opposition parties and their supporters have gone in their condescension. They ignore the specific concerns of Sarawakians, boiling them all down to the issue of “education”. They assume that Sarawakians know less about what they need than the West Malaysian politicians do.

The opposition parties will continue to fail in Sarawak if they refuse to see past their intellectual disdain of voters there. Their declaration of support for Sarawak autonomy becomes mere pretension if they don’t realise that respecting Sarawak’s autonomy also means respecting the right and ability of citizens there to decide what they want.

Adenan Satem didn’t win because of vote buying. He didn’t win because he was in Barisan Nasional. And he didn’t win because of Prime Minister Najib Razak. Adenan won because he took care of Sarawak’s voters, no matter their race or religion. He upheld Sarawak’s independent right to do what it wants. That’s the bottom line.

Losing more than an election

Losing more than an election

You might have been amused by how the sore losers reacted when it became clear on Saturday night that Barisan Nasional would win the Sarawak election. But if you were a Sarawakian or someone who despises uncivilised behaviour, that amusement would have been mixed with a heavy dose of disgust.

As news started coming in to show that BN was romping home with a resounding victory, opposition supporters apparently rushed to their keyboards to post their reactions on Facebook and other social media platforms.

It is hoped that not too many decent people read those reactions. One could imagine them shaking their heads in disbelief. A few might even have vomited out their dinner onto their computer tables.

The low class losers said Sarawakians were “blind” and “moronic”, were “barbarians”, were “a bunch of hopeless drunks” and deserved to “remain poor”.

Now, perhaps, we can understand why Sarawak Chief Minister Adenan Satem was wary about letting too many opposition campaigners into his state.

One wonders who really are blind and barbaric. The people of Sarawak were given their choice of candidates and they made their choices. Some in fact chose opposition candidates.

So what if the majority voted for BN? They had the right to do so, just as Selangorians and Penangites had the right to choose Pakatan in the last general election.

Gerakan: Fairness and kindness can win over Chinese support

Gerakan: Fairness and kindness can win over Chinese support

PETALING JAYA: Sarawak BN’s landslide victory and success in regaining some Chinese-majority seats in the Sarawak state election proves that a fair administration can win over support any day, said Gerakan today.

Gerakan Vice-President Dr Dominic Lau Hoe Chai said the return of Sarawak Chinese voters to BN shows that Chinese voters are more pragmatic and would vote for a government which undertakes fair administration and allocation of resources, regardless of race, religion or level of support.

He said the Sarawak state election results show that the strategy employed by Chief Minister Adenan Satem was correct.

“His fair and liberal administration, especially in matters involving Sarawak Chinese, has won over vast support from the community.

“It also demonstrated the Chinese virtue of expressing gratitude for kindness received,” Lau said in a statement.

The victory also showed the Sarawakians’ rejection of hate politics displayed by the Opposition, especially by the DAP, he added.

“Sarawakians have conveyed a strong and important message in this state election – the people prefer a liberal and moderate leader.

“Demeaning politicians, who attempt to gain cheap publicity through comments implying religious extremism and racism, will not get public support. There is no room for them in Malaysian politics.”

Lau then called on BN, under Prime Minister Najib Razak, to draw inspiration from Sarawak by introducing policies that promoted openness, fairness and moderation.

He wanted Najib to act against individuals who made extremist remarks, regardless of who they were.

“This is to ensure BN is able to win back Chinese support in West Malaysia in the next general election.”