Playboy names first Playmate of the Year in post-nude era

Playboy names first Playmate of the Year in post-nude eraLOS ANGELES: Playboy, adult entertainment’s most iconic publication since Marilyn Monroe appeared as its inaugural centerfold in 1953, on Wednesday named its first Playmate of the Year since doing away with full nudity.

Eugena Washington, a model and actress from Palmdale, California, was unveiled at the opulent Playboy Mansion in Beverly Hills, posing for the world’s media in front of her prize — a Fiat 124 Spider sports car.

The 31-year-old, who also gets $100,000 to spend, is featured on the cover of the June issue — the fourth since it eradicated full-frontal nudity from its pages.

“It’s a great time for this. The world is changing. I hope this brings different eyes to the magazine and new audiences,” Washington said.

Washington, who first appeared in Playboy as the magazine’s December 2015 Playmate of the Month, is only the third black model among 57 to be named Playmate of the Year.

“This is a story and a chapter in my life to build around. I’m enjoying the ride, and right now I’m doing whatever I want to do, day by day,” she said.

Washington’s career began in 2006 when she appeared on Tyra Banks’ “America’s Next Top Model,” finishing in the top three, and she has since played a recurring part on daytime soap opera “The Bold and the Beautiful” and appeared in rom-com “The Perfect Match,” released in March.

Playboy Enterprises, the company which owns the magazine, announced in March it had hired an investment adviser to look at offering itself for a possible buyout.

The sale is expected to be worth a potential $500 million while the iconic Playboy Mansion, put on the market earlier this year, could fetch some $200 million.

The magazine has been pursuing a new image in an age of easy access to online pornography, and has already toned down in order to be allowed on platforms like Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.

Its circulation peaked in 1972 at seven million, but stands at around 800,000 now, editorial director Jason Burhmester told AFP.

“It has sort of balanced out. There were older readers who wanted the nudity who dropped out,” the 42-year-old said.

“And at the same time the news stand sales — because we’re not in a poly-bag anymore and we’re on all the cash registers at Barnes and Noble — has really helped attract a reader who didn’t think about us.”

AFP

Playboy names first Playmate of the Year in post-nude era

Playboy names first Playmate of the Year in post-nude eraLOS ANGELES: Playboy, adult entertainment’s most iconic publication since Marilyn Monroe appeared as its inaugural centerfold in 1953, on Wednesday named its first Playmate of the Year since doing away with full nudity.

Eugena Washington, a model and actress from Palmdale, California, was unveiled at the opulent Playboy Mansion in Beverly Hills, posing for the world’s media in front of her prize — a Fiat 124 Spider sports car.

The 31-year-old, who also gets $100,000 to spend, is featured on the cover of the June issue — the fourth since it eradicated full-frontal nudity from its pages.

“It’s a great time for this. The world is changing. I hope this brings different eyes to the magazine and new audiences,” Washington said.

Washington, who first appeared in Playboy as the magazine’s December 2015 Playmate of the Month, is only the third black model among 57 to be named Playmate of the Year.

“This is a story and a chapter in my life to build around. I’m enjoying the ride, and right now I’m doing whatever I want to do, day by day,” she said.

Washington’s career began in 2006 when she appeared on Tyra Banks’ “America’s Next Top Model,” finishing in the top three, and she has since played a recurring part on daytime soap opera “The Bold and the Beautiful” and appeared in rom-com “The Perfect Match,” released in March.

Playboy Enterprises, the company which owns the magazine, announced in March it had hired an investment adviser to look at offering itself for a possible buyout.

The sale is expected to be worth a potential $500 million while the iconic Playboy Mansion, put on the market earlier this year, could fetch some $200 million.

The magazine has been pursuing a new image in an age of easy access to online pornography, and has already toned down in order to be allowed on platforms like Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.

Its circulation peaked in 1972 at seven million, but stands at around 800,000 now, editorial director Jason Burhmester told AFP.

“It has sort of balanced out. There were older readers who wanted the nudity who dropped out,” the 42-year-old said.

“And at the same time the news stand sales — because we’re not in a poly-bag anymore and we’re on all the cash registers at Barnes and Noble — has really helped attract a reader who didn’t think about us.”

AFP

IMF: Bribery eats up 2% of global economy

IMF: Bribery eats up 2% of global economyWASHINGTON: The International Monetary Fund said Wednesday that bribery sucks up between $1.5 and $2.0 trillion dollars annually around the world, dragging down economies and worsening social services for the poor.

In a new report on the economic impact of corruption, the IMF said that bribery, graft and other cheating common in both rich and poor countries limits economic growth and undermines sound government policies.

In a speech prepared for the global Anti-Corruption Summit in London Thursday, IMF Managing Director Christine Lagarde said that more and more leaders are openly seeking help to fight the scourge.

“Both poverty and unemployment can be symptoms of chronic corruption,” she said, according to the text of her speech.

“While the direct economic costs of corruption are well known, the indirect costs may be even more substantial and debilitating, leading to low growth and greater income inequality.”

Lagarde dismissed the idea that corruption is a stubborn cultural phenomenon in many countries. In fact, it is common across cultures, and countries with diverse backgrounds have found ways to address it, she said.

The late Singapore leader Lee Kuan Yew “was very effective in both signalling a zero-tolerance policy towards corruption and building competent institutions at a time when corruption was pervasive in Singapore,” she noted.

The economic impact of corruption is hard to quantify, according to the IMF report released Wednesday. But despite claims that it helps “grease the wheels” to make economies work, the overall impact is very negative.

The cost of bribery alone tops more than two percent of global gross domestic product — a broad measure of economic output — and because it is tainted, that money is often sucked out of economies to offshore havens, meaning it does not contribute to growth.

Corruption perpetuates economic inefficiency, undermines public policy, and exacerbates inequality, the report says. It also scares off both domestic and foreign investors.

“Investors actually seek out countries that can give them the assurance that, once an investment is made, they will not be blackmailed into providing bribes,” Lagarde said.

The report says that data shows that higher corruption generally correlates with lower social services for the poor. That in part is because government budgets in more corrupt countries get loaded up with the kinds of spending — like big-ticket projects — that offer greater graft opportunities.

Lagarde said that the IMF includes guidance on anti-corruption measures in its support programs for governments, because “pervasive corruption makes it harder to conduct sound fiscal policy.”

Certain approaches have proven effective in a number of countries: paying civil servants more; setting up special anti-corruption courts; punishing companies for corrupt practices in other countries; and creating special offices to collect taxes from the largest taxpayers, to improve compliance.

But Lagarde also stressed the need for rule of law and firm leadership.

“Prosecuting the powerful ‘big fish’ — which is necessary in order to send a clear signal of commitment and change — can only be achieved if a country’s leaders visibly support the process,” she said.

– AFP

Queen calls Chinese delegation ‘very rude’

Queen calls Chinese delegation ‘very rude’LONDON: Queen Elizabeth II was caught on camera describing some Chinese officials as “very rude” in a rare diplomatic gaffe by the British monarch over a visit that drummed up billions in Chinese investment.

Her comments, aired on Wednesday, came just hours after Prime Minister David Cameron on Tuesday also made inadvertently public remarks, referring to Afghanistan and Nigeria as “most corrupt”.

Dressed in a pink coat and hat with white gloves, the queen could be heard during a garden party at Buckingham Palace on Tuesday making unguarded comments about a Chinese state visit last year.

Police commander Lucy D’Orsi was introduced to the queen as the woman who oversaw security for the state visit of President Xi Jinping and his wife in October, to which the monarch replied: “Oh, bad luck”.

The queen went on to say to D’Orsi that members of the Chinese delegation “were very rude to the ambassador” and exclaimed: “Extraordinary!”

The BBC said that the queen’s comments were blanked out on BBC World transmissions in China.

The British monarch never expresses overtly political views in public and is known for her discretion, never granting an interview in her 64-year reign.

Her husband Prince Philip on the other hand is notorious for his gaffes and off-colour jokes.

He told a group of British students during a visit to China in 1986 that they would become “slitty-eyed” if they remained in the country.

Prince Charles has had a famously fraught relationship with China because of his friendship with the Dalai Lama and has yet to make an official visit to the country’s mainland.

He referred to Chinese leaders as “appalling old waxworks” in a private journal entry about the Hong Kong handover ceremony in 1997.

‘Stressful’ visit

London and Beijing both hailed Xi’s visit as a high watermark in Chinese-British relations at the time.

A clutch of contracts said by Cameron to be worth almost £40 billion (51 billion euros, $58 billion) were announced during the visit.

Chinese foreign ministry spokesman Lu Kang on Wednesday said the visit had been “very successful”.

“Both sides have high level recognition of that,” he said.

Foreign minister Philip Hammond, however, was quoted by British media as saying that the visit had been “a bit stressful”.

Buckingham Palace said it would not comment on the queen’s private conversations.

Rana Mitter, director of Oxford University’s China Centre, said the comments were unlikely to hamper ties and “a significant pushback” from Britain on security for Xi’s visit could have been expected.

“I think the Chinese are extremely pragmatic on these sorts of things. There is a perception that the UK is an important enough trading and political partners that this sort of incident isn’t going to get in the way,” he said.

“I suspect that Chinese officials are far more concerned about the prospect of Britain leaving the European Union than they are about the overheard comments of high-level figures,” he said.

On Tuesday, Cameron was overheard at another Buckingham Palace event to mark the queen’s birthday calling Nigeria and Afghanistan “possibly the two most corrupt countries in the world”.

He was filmed making the remarks to the queen and Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby, ahead of an anti-corruption summit in London on Thursday where the Afghan and Nigerian presidents are expected.

“We’ve got some leaders of some fantastically corrupt countries coming to Britain,” the prime minister said.

“Nigeria and Afghanistan, possibly the two most corrupt countries in the world,” he added.

Welby, who worked as an oil executive in West Africa before joining the church and who has also undertaken conflict resolution work in Nigeria, noted that “this particular president is actually not corrupt”.

“He’s really trying,” Cameron agreed, and the queen noted to Welby: “He is trying, isn’t he?”

It was not clear to whom they were referring, but Nigerian President Muhammadu Buhari and Afghanistan’s President Ashraf Ghani are both due to attend the summit.

In anti-bribery watchdog Transparency International’s Corruption Perceptions Index for 2015, Afghanistan ranks 166th and Nigeria 136th out of 168 countries and territories.

– AFP

Microchip to be placed on sexual offenders’ legs

Microchip to be placed on sexual offenders’ legs

JAKARTA: Rapists in Indonesia will now face a heavy penalty if found guilty. Other than being castrated, they will have microchips on their legs upon leaving prison.

Indonesia’s Coordinating Minister for Human Development and Culture Puan Maharani said the government had agreed on the punishment at a special meeting chaired by President Joko Widodo today.

Online media quoted Puan Maharani as saying the clasping of microchips was to allow monitoring of offenders and for society to know they were former rapists.

“In the special meeting, it was was decided that in connection with the protection of children against sexual crimes, the government will issue Government Regulation In Lieu of Law (Perpu), namely to provide a maximum 20-year imprisonment,” she said.

The punishment for rape currently is imprisonment of not more than 10 years.

Perpu was a rule of law stipulated by the president and would become a national law after it was signed by the president.

She said other than castrations and the clasping of microchips, the identities of the offenders would continue to be published despite having undergone sentences.

She said President Jokowi wanted a heavy form of punishment against rapists as proof of the government’s commitment in looking after the lot of women, especially children.

Meanwhile, Minister of Law and Human Rights Yasonna Laoly said castration would be carried out chemically, and after the offender was freed, the authorities would place a microchip on his leg to monitor his movements.

-BERNAMA

French 19-year-old commits suicide live on Periscope

French 19-year-old commits suicide live on Periscope

PARIS: French prosecutors launched an investigation Wednesday after a 19-year-old woman committed suicide by throwing herself in front of a suburban train in Paris and streamed the act live on Periscope.

The unnamed French woman “sent a text to one of her friends several minutes before her death to make them aware of her intentions,” said prosecutor Eric Lallement.

“She also made statements to Internet users via the Periscope application to explain her act.”

The victim also “spoke of a rape and named the aggressor” during the filming, a judicial source said, adding that the claims were being treated with caution at this stage.

Footage of the woman’s actual death, which took place on Tuesday at a station in Egly to the south of Paris, was removed by Periscope but some of the video leading up to the suicide was still available on YouTube.

The victim is seen on a couch, smoking a cigarette, saying the video is “not designed to create a buzz… but to make people react, to open their minds, and nothing else”.

The video then cuts to a black screen, and what appear to be the voices of emergency personnel can be faintly heard. Messages of concern from Periscope users are seen flashing up on the screen.

Periscope is a smartphone application that allows users to stream live video via their Twitter account. The video usually remains accessible for 24 hours.

Police said they were informed by someone watching the stream.

“We were alerted around 4:30 pm by a Periscope user who was connected with the victim and told us that she was not well,” a police source said.

Twitter, which bought Periscope in 2015, said it did not comment on individual accounts.

An investigation has been opened into the circumstances of the suicide.

“Once the first results of the analysis of the victim’s mobile telephone and the images diffused by Periscope are known, the investigators will attempt to specify the motivations for her act, and if necessary, to enlarge the investigation,” Lallement said in a statement.

Disturbing incidents have become increasingly common on live-streaming services.

An 18-year-old woman appeared in court in the US state of Ohio last month accused of filming the rape of her 17-year-old friend by a 29-year-old man and live-streaming it on Periscope.

Marina Lonina “got caught up in the likes” that Periscope users gave the video, her lawyer told the court.

-AFP

Philippines’ Duterte set for wild foreign policy ride

Philippines’ Duterte set for wild foreign policy rideMANILA: After proposing a jet-ski mission to defend remote islands against China, daring the United States to sever ties and joking about burning Singapore’s flag, Rodrigo Duterte is set for a wild foreign policy ride as the next Philippine president.

The firebrand politician stormed to victory in national elections this week using an incendiary brand of populism and nationalism that his aides insist he will moderate once he has the keys to the presidential palace on June 30.

Duterte branded the pope a “son of a whore” and angrily told the US and Australian ambassadors to “shut their mouths” after they criticised a joke he made about rape.

The 71-year-old offered no apologies when asked by AFP on election night for a message to members of the international diplomatic community who may be concerned.

“It is not to contribute to the comfort of other nations. I have to make the Filipino comfortable first before I give you comfort, outside my country,” he said.

Duterte, the long-time mayor of southern Davao city, thrilled his supporters but outraged his critics with a series of diplomatic firebombs on the campaign trail.

While his insults caused gasps in various capitals, his foray into a delicate maritime dispute with China — involving many nations but with the Philippines a key player — may have the most far-reaching impact.

Playing to nationalist sentiment, Duterte vowed to ride a jet ski to plant a Philippine flag on remote South China Sea islands, where Beijing is accused of using bully-boy tactics to intimidate smaller nations with rival claims.

But he also signalled a potentially signficant reversal of government policy, saying he would be prepared to hold direct talks with China on the issue — potentially shattering the united front of claimant nations backed by the United States.

“By the Philippines breaking ranks over this issue, it might affect… efforts to fend off China’s intrusion. There is a need to be united over this issue,” said Faisal Syam Hazis, head of the Centre for Asia Studies at the National University of Malaysia.

Insults fly

Other foreign policy stumbles sprang from Duterte’s no-holds-barred election pitch. At one rally he recounted how he had personally killed inmates who had staged a 1989 Davao prison riot.

But he also said that in the aftermath of the riot he discovered that an Australian missionary had been raped and murdered.

“I was mad she was raped. But she was so beautiful. I thought: ‘The mayor should have been first’,” said Duterte, who on the campaign trail also repeatedly boasted about his mistresses and sexual prowess.

The Australian and US ambassadors criticised the comments, triggering a furious reaction from the contender, who told them not to interfere and raised the prospect of cutting diplomatic ties.

Duterte also enraged Singapore when he said at a rally he would burn its flag in reaction to its embassy disavowing a hoax statement which purportedly said it endorsed him.

A different Duterte?

Diplomats can expect a different Duterte when he becomes president, according to his spokesman, Peter Lavina.

“You have to understand the Philippine style of elections. The context is most of our politicians need to communicate to our audience so many of our politicians sing and dance,” Lavina told reporters on Tuesday when explaining that the Singapore flag burning remark was a joke.

“Some make jokes, some make funny faces. Some dress outrageously. So it is all in this context that all these jokes, bantering, happen during the campaign. We don’t expect the same attitude of our officials thereafter.”

Lavina acknowledged there were “problems” with the US, Australian and — particularly — the Singaporean embassies.

“We need to send out personal envoys to open lines of communication and express openness to cooperate,” he said.

However on election night Duterte appeared to still be in campaign mode when asked if would seek to fix ties with the United States and Australia.

“I will not mend,” he said. “It is up to them if they want to mend their ways.”

China thaw?

In China, at least, his foreign policy platform has been welcomed — despite the jet ski jibe.

Relations went into deep freeze during the current administration of President Benigno Aquino due to the maritime dispute which has seen Washington send warships close to the islands.

“The United States will be concerned if, in the new regime, they have a leader that is more willing to negotiate some of the… red lines that are shaping up around the South China Sea disputes,” said Ashley Townshend from the University of Sydney.

The Communist Party-backed Global Times on Wednesday sounded a hopeful note.

“He opposes the idea of going to war with China, wants direct negotiation with Beijing about the South China Sea, and doesn’t believe in solving the conflict through an international tribunal,” it said.

“If there is anything that can be changed by Duterte, it will be diplomacy.”

– AFP

West Ham vows life bans for bus attack fans

West Ham vows life bans for bus attack fansLONDON: West Ham United on Wednesday vowed to ban for life any fans found to have taken part in an attack on the Manchester United team bus before their key Premier League game.

The attacked marred West Ham’s 3-2 win over the English giants in the final match at the London club’s Boleyn Ground on Tuesday night. The match was delayed for 45 minutes because of the incidents.

“It was an extraordinary night full of extraordinary moments in front of extraordinary fans, 99 percent of whom behaved impeccably and were a credit to the club,” the club said in a statement.

“However, we are aware that there were some supporters outside the Boleyn Ground who didn’t act in an appropriate way when the Manchester United team bus was damaged.

“That was not acceptable and we will work with the police to identify those responsible and ban them for life.”

West Ham co-chairman David Sullivan had initially blamed United for the delay to kick-off, saying they should have arrived earlier at the ground.

– AFP

Leicester City set to offer Ranieri long-term contract

Leicester City set to offer Ranieri long-term contract

LONDON: Leicester City will discuss a possible contract extension with manager Claudio Ranieri at the end of the season as a reward for his role in the club’s maiden Premier League title victory, vice-chairman Aiyawatt Srivaddhanaprabha has said.

Italian Ranieri took over from Nigel Pearson on a three-year contract in July and Leicester are keen to offer him improved terms and tie him down to a long-term deal in the wake of his spectacular achievement.

“At the end of the season we will talk about that (extending Ranieri’s contract) with him,” Srivaddhanaprabha told British media.

“We will sit down together and when we talk about something, it’s long term, not just until September. I like people to work for me when they are happy and enjoy working with the group of people.”

Srivaddhanaprabha, son of Leicester’s billionaire Thai owner Vichai, reiterated the club’s commitment to keeping their best players and strengthening the squad in the close season.

Speculation has mounted in the days following Leicester’s remarkable title triumph that the likes of midfielder Riyad Mahrez, midfield enforcer N’Golo Kante and top scorer Jamie Vardy may be lured away by bigger rivals in England or Europe.

“We will try everything that we can to build the team and to secure the same group of players and add some quality,” Aiyawatt added.

“I have to talk to all of the scouts when they give me the lists. I have to talk to Claudio about which player he wants. I always support, always.”

– Reuters

Cauliflower captures our culinary imagination

 

Cauliflower captures our culinary imagination

Cauliflower is about to become the new kale, according to something I read online. And that’s just fine with me, because I have grown awfully tired of kale. When a vegetable becomes nothing but a raw garnish, as kale has, a limp and lifeless ruffle at the edge of your plate, then you know its star-studded status is truly over and done with.

I suppose kale had its virtues, but there is a reason we all had to be taught to love it, and not only to love it but to contort it into all sorts of iterations, some of which were less than inviting. Raw kale in a salad, for me, is just plain roughage, and as for a kale smoothie, well, the less said the better, I feel.

And now kale is, as they say, so last year.

On to cauliflower, then, which itself offers almost as many possibilities as kale, although plate decoration maybe isn’t one of them. Unlike kale, cauliflower is fully as delicious raw as it is cooked, delightful in a salad or on a tray of crudités (raw vegetables) served with a dipping sauce.

Cauliflower, a versatile vegetable

And once cauliflower is cooked, it can be turned into any number of other dishes, starting with cauliflower on its own, garnished with black olives and capers, perhaps with toasted pine nuts or slivered almonds on top. Take the leftovers of that dish, chop them up and toss over medium heat in a few tablespoons of olive oil, just long enough to brown them, and you’ll have a perfect sauce for a suppertime pasta dish, in the Italian style of just-about-anything-goes-with-pasta. Call it penne al cavolfiore and tell your guests you had it last summer in Sicily.

Or cook the cauliflower a little longer in some chicken stock, along with a small potato cubed, until both vegetables are very tender, stir in a dollop of cream, then purée the whole thing until smooth as velvet and you will have a superbly elegant French soup to serve as a starter – crème velouté au choufleur. And it’s even more impressive with a spoonful of very fine cultured butter, maybe another dribble of cream and a scattering of fresh chives over the top.

Then there’s that old-fashioned English dish called cauliflower cheese, in which the cauliflower, cooked just till you can easily break apart the florets, is arranged in a buttered dish, covered with a sauce Mornay and transferred to a hot oven until the sauce has blistered slightly and browned on top and the florets are tender.

And what is a sauce Mornay? Simple: Make a béchamel sauce with 2 tablespoons of butter and 2 tablespoons of flour, stirring together over medium-low heat until the mixture is thick and has lost its floury smell.

Stir into it, a little at a time, 2 cups of very hot milk, whisking all the while, until you have a thick sauce, then add a couple of handfuls of grated cheese – Parmigiano, cheddar, Gruyère, it almost doesn’t matter as long as it’s a firm cheese that’s easy to grate. (This is a good way to use up leftover bits of cheese in that drawer in the refrigerator where you’ve hidden them all.) You can add salt, pepper, maybe some cayenne if you wish, and that’s all there is to it.

Despite its pale color, cauliflower is actually one of those powerhouse brassica vegetables and a surprisingly good source of vitamin C. When shopping, look for tightly clustered clean, white heads with fresh green leaves. You’ll trim off the leaves and stem for cooking, but don’t discard them. Chopped in smaller pieces, they make a nice addition to a vegetable minestrone. And what about packaged, cut florets in the supermarket produce section? Don’t bother. They are a waste of money, flavor and vitamins.

Cauliflower With Lemon, Capers and Black Olives

  • Prep time: About 10 minutes
  • Cook time: About 15 minutes
  • Total time: About 25 minutes
  • Yield: 4 to 6 servings
  • Ingredients
  • 1 firm head of cauliflower, about 1 pound
  • 1/2 cup pitted black olives, coarsely chopped
  • 1 heaping tablespoon salt-packed capers, rinsed and drained
  • 2 tablespoons finely chopped flat-leaf parsley
  • Grated zest and juice of 1 lemon
  • Sea salt
  • Pinch of crushed red chili pepper
  • 2 garlic cloves, crushed and chopped
  • 1/3 cup olive oil, preferably a deep-flavored oil from Italy or Greece
  • 2 tablespoons or more of toasted pine nuts or slivered almonds for garnishing, if desired

Directions

  1. Trim the cauliflower and break the head into florets.
  2. On a chopping board, combine the olives, capers, parsley and lemon zest and chop together to mix well.
  3. Bring a pot of water large enough to hold the cauliflower to a rolling boil. Add a big pinch of salt and, when it returns to a boil, add the cauliflower. Cook until just barely tender, about 6 minutes (less if using very small florets).
  4. Meanwhile, in a skillet large enough to hold all the ingredients, warm the chili pepper and garlic in the oil over medium-low heat until hot, 3 or 4 minutes. The chili and garlic should be starting to melt in the oil, rather than sizzling and browning.
  5. Stir in the lemon juice and cook for another 2 minutes, then add the olive-caper mix, give it a stir, take it off the heat and set aside.
  6. Drain the cauliflower well, shaking the colander. Combine the cauliflower with the olive-caper dressing in the skillet and set the skillet back over medium heat. Warm it up to serving temperature, tasting to make sure the seasoning is right, and serve, garnishing with toasted pine nuts or slivered almonds if you wish.

Note: This recipe is equally good with broccoli or with romanesco, the green spiral cauliflower. You can also mix white cauliflower and green romanesco together for a handsome presentation. If you wish to serve this as a pasta sauce, simply chop or break the florets into smaller pieces. Add everything to a skillet and set over low heat to warm while you cook about 1 pound (500 grams) of penne or similar short, stubby pasta according to package directions. As the pasta finishes cooking, add a little pasta water to the cauliflower and raise the heat. Drain the pasta and combine in the skillet with the cauliflower sauce, tossing to mix. Serve immediately, passing grated cheese if you wish.

– Reuters